Tuesday, 22 November 2016

Mandarin is a Manchurian Language



The reputable Qing Historians who understand the Manchu language, have successfully established that: 

"Mandarin is today the Sinitic language characterized by the least number of tones and the largest share of polysyllabic vocabulary, with a tendency towards suffixal morphology and syntactic constructions of the Altaic type. This structural transformation has been termed the Altaicization of China. One may say that the Liaodong dialect, that came to be called Mandarin, was formed upon an Altaic underlying layer. Janhunen observes that, “with some exaggeration, Mandarin could even be characterized as a Manchurian language.” The Altaicized Lioadong Chinese dialect, or rather the language of Han Chinese bannermen, was taken to Beijing by the Manchu conquerors, and in due course consolidated its position as “the language of civil servants” through the Qing civil service examination system. Called Mandarin, it was retained as the official language of modern China, reminiscent of the English that was retained as the official language of Indian in her 1950 constitution (and the 1967 amendment). The leaders of modern China, however, never delve into the origin and root of the modern Chinese language. Being immersed in Sinocentric historiography, most historians have failed to notice such a “linguistic conquest.”"


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